Entries for the ‘Job Seekers’ Category

10 Basic Skills that Every Manager Should Have

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Protocall Group Logo

June 2017
10 Basic Skills that Every Manager Should Have
By Sharlyn Lauby

 

There are many skills that managers can learn on the job. For example, they can learn how to approve time cards, the key elements in an employment law, or the steps in conducting a good interview. But there are some basic skills or qualities that organizations want to see in managers from day one.

So, if you’re an HR professional trying to communicate expectations for the management team, this list might be helpful. Or, if you’re an individual who wants to eventually become a manager, think about building on these basic skills:

  1. Verbal communication. First and foremost, managers are coaches. They provide feedback to employees, conduct training, and offer performance guidance. As such, they need to be able to effectively hold a two-way conversation.

  2. Asking questions. I’m viewing this a little differently than problem-solving. I believe you can teach someone a problem-solving model. Managers need to be curious and willing to ask questions (versus assuming an answer). They also need to be open to letting others know when they don’t know something.

  3. Listening. I didn’t want to lump this in with verbal communication (#1) because it’s too important. This is also part of asking questions (#2). Coworkers are okay with a little silence. The best managers know when to stop talking and listen. They also know how to listen effectively.

  4. Time management. When managers have too many projects and not enough time, they are forced to prioritize their work. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, except if employees become a low priority. Managers must be able to manage their time and still accomplish their goals – while supporting the needs of their employees.

  5. Decision making. Speaking of prioritizing, the only way to do it effectively involves good decision making. Managers should be able to look at a situation and make an assessment about what to do. If they need additional information to make the decision, they can use skills #1, #2, and #3 to get what they need.

  6. Customer service. Managers have multiple customers – both internal and external ones. They need to understand who their customers are, what they want, and how to engage them. This will be critical for effective time management and decision making.

  7. Thinking. What I mean by this is managers know when to go “big picture” and when to focus on details – or both. Again, these basic skills do have a certain amount of connectivity. Good decision making involves knowing when you have the right amount of information – which will be very different – depending on your thinking.

  8. Stress management. We can’t tell others how to manage their stress. But how we manage our own stress impacts others. Managers need to be able to recognize and manage their own stress levels. And demonstrate a certain amount of calmness for the team.

  9. Conflict management. Managers should be able to address conflict both in terms of helping others resolve their conflicts AND being willing to defend their position, even if that means disagreeing with their boss or colleagues. They need to know how to mediate as well as manage workplace conflict.

  10. Written communication. Online collaboration and recognition tools make it easy to communicate with employees. But like email, it’s hard to read inflection and emotion. Managers need to have good writing skills so their words will be understood and interpreted correctly.

Organizations place a lot of responsibilities on their managers. It’s important to clearly state the expectations of the role. Employees who want to be promoted into a manager position need to understand the basic skills they should demonstrate – and why they need to have them. The more open and transparent organizations are about skills, the more opportunities they can create for employees to develop them.

 


 

Sharlyn Lauby is the author of HR Bartender (www.hrbartender.com), a friendly place to discuss workplace issues. When not tending bar, she is president of ITM Group, Inc., which specializes in training solutions to help clients retain and engage talent. She can be contacted on Twitter at @HRBartender.


About The Protocall Group
The Protocall Group has been providing temporary, temp-to-hire, direct hire and contract staffing solutions throughout the South Jersey and Philadelphia Metro region since 1965. Specializing in the Healthcare, Industrial and Office and Professional industries for over 50 years, the Protocall Group team prides itself in their willingness to go the extra mile and answering the call for their customers and employees. The Protocall Group is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages diversity in the workforce.

For more information about The Protocall Group and its services, please visit them online at www.protocallgroup.com

Rethink How We Reskill Workers for the Future

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Protocall Group Logo

June 2017
Rethink How We Reskill Workers for the Future
By John Bourdreau

Recent data suggests that about 7.4 million workers were displaced between January 2013 and December 2015. That’s down from 9.5 million between 2011-2013, reflecting improving economic conditions.

Freelance platforms, such as Uber, Lyft and TaskRabbit, can be thanked in part for the improvement. By providing sustainable alternatives to traditional “jobs,” such platforms are prime for reintegrating people into the workforce. For example, experienced machine operators who have been displaced can work remotely as training specialists, instructing their replacements when factories relocate.

But there are still plenty of people being left behind by technological progress. And it’s not always possible for platforms to simply apply workers’ capabilities from a previous job to the next. Instead, the majority of workers will need to “reskill” as the job market evolves. Rob Kaplan, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, recently noted that, “As technology increasingly disrupts various types of jobs–and challenges whole industries–the need for workers to be trained and retrained during their careers is likely to substantially increase in the years ahead.”

The problem with his proposal? We’re not taking advantage of the full potential of “reskilling” workers. Conversations and solutions around job displacement are often limited for two reasons: 1) They focus exclusively on traditional jobs rather than “deconstructed” work; and 2) They focus on regional partnerships, rather than considering the global work ecosystem. Important solutions require seeing beyond “jobs” and beyond localities; some of the most intriguing solutions involve both working together.

A typical argument about the future of work is that employers, schools and universities in a particular region must prepare local workers for new jobs. For example, Kaplan noted, “Ultimately skills-training partnerships must be created locally,” and “Business leaders can take the initiative to work with local high schools, colleges and community-based organizations to develop curricula that would produce candidates with the skills needed to fill job openings.”

However, is local coordination for traditional jobs truly the recipe that works? Is the local recipe the only one that works?

Work Deconstruction and Worker Globalization

According to Rusty Justice, the answer is no. Justice is a Kentucky mining veteran who co-founded a company called Bit Source to retrain coal miners into programmers. He observed that miners are accustomed to deep focus, team play and working with complex engineering technology. “Coal miners are really technology workers who get dirty,” Justice says. And he’s not alone in his thinking: A recent WIRED article revealed that Justice got 950 applications for his first 11 positions.

How did he come to this alternative solution to job displacement? First, Justice deconstructed the job of a coal miner to reveal that much of the work overlapped with the work of computer coders. Deconstruction reveals how to reskill with more precision, augmenting coal miner skills just enough to fit the closely-related job of computer coder. This is very different from trying to convert coal miners to qualify for available local jobs (such as in-home care or retail management) that may be quite different. Second, unlike coal mining, coding can be done remotely. Former coal miners now qualify not only for local jobs, but can tap a global work ecosystem through coding platforms like Freelancer.

Innovative solutions often require both work deconstruction and tapping the global work ecosystem.

The Human Element Behind “Artificial” Intelligence

In a recent article, I suggested that displaced workers who are experts at manufacturing or other skills might find future work as remote training managers for their replacements. But those workers could also find work as trainers of the artificial intelligence (AI) that will guide robotic automation.

Often, AI is only partially “artificial.” Behind the AI are often individual employees, such as Kala, a mother in Bangalore, India who spends hours every week identifying questionable content for sites like YouTube and Facebook. Her job is not only to quickly remove such content, but also to help train the AI of tech companies like Google, Facebook, Twitter and Microsoft to better recognize such content.

If we want to create sustainable solutions to blue collar job loss, we need to think longer-term. HR professionals, business leaders, policy makers and workers should acknowledge local reskilling for jobs as a vital solution–but it’s only one solution. Complete solutions require integrating new innovations and new definitions of “work.”

 


 

John Boudreau is professor and research director at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business and Center for Effective Organizations. Boudreau, David Creelman and Ravin Jesuthasan are the authors of a forthcoming book, Lead the Work.

This article was originally printed in ReWork, an online magazine sponsored by Cornerstone OnDemand, a leader in cloud-based applications for talent management that helps organizations recruit, train, manage, and connect their employees.


 

About The Protocall Group
The Protocall Group has been providing temporary, temp-to-hire, direct hire and contract staffing solutions throughout the South Jersey and Philadelphia Metro region since 1965. Specializing in the Healthcare, Industrial and Office and Professional industries for over 50 years, the Protocall Group team prides itself in their willingness to go the extra mile and answering the call for their customers and employees. The Protocall Group is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer and encourages diversity in the workforce.

For more information about The Protocall Group and its services, please visit them online at www.protocallgroup.com

The Protocall Group Announces New Office in Newtown Square, PA

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NewOffice_NewtownSq

 The Protocall Group Announces New Office in Newtown Square, PA

May 2017

 

Newtown Square, PA – The Protocall Group, a regional recruitment and staffing company, is growing by leaps and bounds. The company is excited to announce the opening of a new full-service office to better serve our customers and employees in the Delaware County region. The Protocall Group’s Healthcare Division officially opened a new office on April 28, 2017 at 3415 West Chester Pike – Suite 104, Newtown Square, PA, 19073.

 

Two of The Protocall Group’s most talented Staffing Supervisors, Jaymes Cannon and Desiree Blakemore, will be managing the new location to better service an array of customers from Mainline Health to other entities around the Newtown Square area. Both Jaymes and Desiree will be working closely with our partners to ensure the quality service that The Protocall Group has reliably provided for over 50 years will not be affected by this exciting new move. Jaymes and Desiree can be reached in the new Newtown Square office at 610.356.4340.

 

Protocall Healthcare is certified by The Joint Commission for providing quality healthcare staffing professionals to hospitals, physician group practices and healthcare facilities. The healthcare staffing services certification process provides a comprehensive evaluation of key functional areas such as processes for verifying the credentials and competencies of provided healthcare staff. The Joint Commission Staffing Certification requirements ensure that a healthcare facility’s HR Accreditation Requirements of Infection Control, Cultural Diversity, National Patient Safety Goals, Licensure Verification, Education and Training, Assessing and Reassessing Competency and Clinical Background Checks are met. The Joint Commission standards and emphasis on clinical practice guidelines require consistency in our approach to care, and ensures continuous compliance to standards and performance improvements, thus reducing the risk factor.

 

The Protocall Group has been providing temporary, temp-to-hire, direct hire and contract staffing solutions to employers throughout the South Jersey and Philadelphia Metro region since 1965. Specializing in the Healthcare, Industrial and Office and Professional industries for over 50 years, the Protocall Group team prides itself in their willingness to go the extra mile, and always making sure to answer the call for their customers and employees. For more information about The Protocall Group and its services, please visit them online at www.protocallgroup.com.

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For more information, please contact Laura Gomez at lgomez@protocallgroup.com

Ramifications to Consider as a Result of a Reduction in Force

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Protocall_Staffing

 

May 2017
Ramifications to Consider as a Result of a Reduction in Force
By Strategic Human Resources, Inc.

Question:

As a result of a Reduction in Force (RIF), we have had to reassign certain tasks to other remaining employees.  What are some ramifications I need to be aware of as a result of doing so?  (i.e. review job descriptions, exempt/non-exempt status, etc.)

Answer:

A Reduction in Force is not pleasant, but is sometimes necessary to keep the business running in a positive way. The RIF not only affects the person being released from their job, but also the remaining employees who may have an impact on their job duties as well.

According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the definition of a RIF “occurs when changing priorities, budgetary constraints, or other business conditions requires a company to abolish positions. A RIF can also occur when a position changes so significantly that the employee is no longer able to perform that required duty.”

If an organization is contemplating a RIF or a layoff, there are several factors to take into consideration such as reviewing state and federal statutes including the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN), the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), and the Older Workers Benefit Protection Act (OWBPA).

When considering a RIF follow these basic compliance steps:

  1.   Select the employees for the layoff

  2.   Avoid adverse/disparate impact

  3.   Review federal and state WARN regulations to stay compliant

  4.   Review OWBPA regulations for compliance (for employees age 40 and over)

  5.   Determine severance package and additional services (if any)

  6.   Prepare for the layoff meetings

  7.   Inform remaining workforce of the layoffs

The key is to be prepared with what you are going to say to the employee and review the necessary documents to be sure you are compliant. The next consideration is to have a plan about who will absorb the terminated person’s job tasks. Consider cross training employees on job tasks to be ready for these unforeseen times and to have coverage in the absence of employees when out of the office for personal reasons.

Be prepared with a plan and look at the strengths and weaknesses of your team so you are not caught off guard!

 


Strategic Human Resources Inc., is a national full-service HR management firm based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Our president and founder, Robin Throckmorton, can be reached at Robin@strategichrinc.com.

Creative Ways to Welcome a New Hire

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Protocall_Staffing

April 2017
Creative Ways to Welcome a New Hire
By Amanda Groves

Starting a new job can be a pretty stressful experience. You want it to go smoothly so that your new hire feels happy and welcomed, and settles into the position as quickly as possible. While onboarding can be an effective way of achieving this, it won’t work well if it’s boring or regimented. Let’s look beyond the usual checklists and documentation, training, and tours, to find other, more creative things you can do to help employees adjust to their new work environment successfully.

Get the timing right

A busy Monday morning isn’t always the best time to introduce a new hire to their colleagues. Consider starting them later in the week, or, if possible, on a Friday when everyone is more relaxed and can bond more easily. If there’s a team outing or night out planned, you could always invite the person to come along before they start on their first day. Informal meetings are great for getting to know people. Plus, being able to then walk into a new working environment and see a few familiar faces can be very reassuring.

Use the buddy system

There is always a lot to take in when you’re starting a new job, so pair your new hire with a buddy or mentor. Typically the buddy should be a more experienced staff member who doesn’t have a managerial relationship with your new employee. A buddy will be able to answer questions, provide support, and help establish rapport with other staff members. Remember, everyone needs a friend at work, even if it’s just to ask where the best places are to get lunch.

Set up their workspace

This isn’t just about making sure the new person has everything they might need to perform their job. Think outside the box to make them feel really welcome. That might mean creating a welcome pack that’s filled with items branded with the company logo. Everyone likes presents and with a little attention to detail you can make your new hire feel special and like they’re a valued part of the team.

Establish a tradition

Maybe it’s bringing in coffee and donuts every time someone new starts, or the team all going out for lunch together to a favorite spot. Food and conversation helps break down barriers and offers everyone a social break away from their work. If your company has happy hour, invite the new person along for a drink in their honor.

Give them something to do

If the day isn’t filled with training and onboarding activities, give your new hire some small tasks related to their role to get them started. The first day can leave new employees feeling that they haven’t achieved very much, so giving them work to do will ease them into the job. That way they can leave with a sense of accomplishment and with an eye toward what they will be working on next.

End the day with a chat

Before they leave for the day, ask new hires how they’re making out. How was their first day? Do they have any questions or concerns? Briefly outline what they can expect to be doing in the next week so they know what to expect or look forward to. Thanking them for coming on board and reassuring them that the first day can be a little overwhelming can go a long way toward making people feel comfortable and positive about their new role.

There are plenty of small, thoughtful things that can be easily integrated into the more formal aspects of the onboarding process to help make starting a new job smooth and easy.


 

Amanda Groves is the marketing manager at Jazz (www.jazzhr.com), the first performance recruiting platform. Jazz is on a mission to make recruiting and hiring easy, effective, and scalable no matter what growth looks like at your company. The Jazz Performer Platform doesn’t just help your company grow, it can help your recruiting process grow up, putting you on the path to hiring “Performers Only.”

Searching for a Job in a Competitive Market

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rvlsoft/Bigstock.com

rvlsoft/Bigstock.com

With the job market more competitive than ever; searching for a new job can be completely overwhelming. This is why it’s essential for you to take advantage of some of the job-seeking tools available to you such as LinkedIn and your local recruiting firm. Used correctly, these tools can be extremely useful when  searching for your dream job.

LinkedIn

This is a professional social networking site. LinkedIn is currently the most powerful and effective site for networking. Networking no longer has to take place in-person. With LinkedIn you can build professional relationships with just a few keystrokes. You can connect with other professionals in your related field/industry or even reconnect with old colleagues. Also, you can follow different companies that you might be interested in working for. LinkedIn can help you stay up-to-date with what is going on in that organization and even what internal jobs are open.

LinkedIn is also a great for recruiters and employers to find out more about you. LinkedIn allows you to put your work experience, organizations you are involved in and any educational experiences/certifications. Recruiters frequently use LinkedIn as a way to stay up-to-date with potential candidates’ skills and qualifications. Just make sure you update your profile regularly to include your most recent experience!

Recruiting/Staffing Firms

Working with a recruiter is like working with a matchmaker. They make sure you are a perfect match for that organization. When it comes to the hiring process, recruiters can help you stand out among other applicants by highlighting your achievements and qualifications to the company’s hiring manager. It’s important to remember that today is a competitive job market and it moves quickly. Do not assume recruiters will have a job for you in that exact moment. It takes a few weeks to find a “perfect fit”. Finally, the key is to keep the recruiter up-to-date on your current qualifications and skills.

 

It’s Environmental Service Week! Thank You Protocall Group EVS Employees

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The Protocall Group’s healthcare staffing division, along with The Association for the Healthcare Environment (AHE) of the American Hospital Association (AHA), is celebrating National Environmental Services and Housekeeping Week this week September 11-17, 2016.

As an employer of Environmental Services (EVS) technicians in positions throughout South Jersey and Greater Philadelphia, The Protocall Group would like to thank each and every one of our valued staff for their dedication, professionalism and adhering to Joint Commission quality standards each and every day.

We thank you all and would like to recognize:

Carl Beaty, Anthony Bonet, Lauren Brown, Candace Calloway, Theresa Daniles, Kelvin Fleming, John Green, Arlita Hurst, Honest Kamara, Amy Lewis, Mardro McBurrows, Rodney McCaskill, Eugene Mcmillion, John Perry, Karl Rainey, Jeffrey Sansbury, Tatyana Simmons, Kevin Sims, Jonathan Smalls, Kadeem Steplight, Aaliyah Thomas, Burt Thomas, Dimitri Tolliver, Najee Underwood, Harold Williams and Dayana Young.

The environmental service worker maintains environmental and infection control standards within established policies and procedures of the healthcare facility they are assigned to. They perform a variety of general cleaning tasks to maintain patient rooms, offices, hallways and other assigned areas of the facility. They also distribute and track clean linens to user departments and maintain stock levels on nursing floors. The position follows standard practices and procedures and complies with regulatory requirements. However, as a Joint Commission Certified Healthcare Staffing Firm, our EVS employees adhere to the highest industry standards as put forth by our own reputation as well as The Joint Commission.

Zach Fazio, Vice-President of Healthcare Operations, states, “Our EVS employees are valued and they make a difference each and every day to assure that everyone that steps foot in a healthcare facility that we staff, can be assured of the highest quality of cleanliness and infection prevention.”

Click here to learn more about Environmental Services and Housekeeping Week.

 

The Protocall Group is a Joint Commission Certified Healthcare Staffing firm and a provider of nursing, allied health and environmental health services professionals. Doing business with a Joint Commission Certified Healthcare Staffing Company, ensures:

A Greater Level of Confidence… You can trust that the processes Protocall incorporates have met the rigorous requirements set forth by The Joint Commission.

Third Party Source of Information… Demonstrates our staffing firm’s commitment to providing quality services as measured against national third-party standards.

Highest Standards of Quality and Safety… Ensures that Protocall has met Joint Commission human resource standards for all placed clinical staff.

Labor Day – The History and Meaning Behind this National Holiday

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Bigstock/LoveGraphic

Bigstock/LoveGraphic

Labor Day, the first Monday of September, is typically associated with the end of the summer season, one last long weekend for BBQ’s.  But do you know what this national holiday actually means or know the history behind this celebration?

Labor Day was created by the labor movement in the late 19th century.  It began as an parade in New York City organized by union leaders.  At first the leaders worried that workers were hesitant to forego a day’s pay to participate in the rally, but over 10,000 people had taken part in the rally and festivities. 

Holding annual festivities to celebrate workers spread across the country.  However, Labor Day didn’t become a national holiday until a decade later. In 1887, Oregon was the first state to declare it a holiday, followed by New York, Massachusetts and Colorado.  In 1896, President Grover Cleveland declared the first Monday in September a national holiday.

Why a Monday?  One of the most influential labor unions was the Knights of Labor which is located in New York. The union leaders wanted the first demonstration to coincide with their annual conference which took place in early September.  The first Monday of September stuck after the third annual New York City Labor Day was scheduled on this day in 1884.

Did you know that there is a Labor Day and a May Day (International Workers’ Day)?  Both days are celebrated, but Labor Day is the official national holiday and May Day is unofficially celebrated on May 1.  International Workers’ Day arose out of what began as a peaceful demonstration in Chicago by protesters demanding an 8-hour work day. The demonstration turned violent when someone threw a bomb at the police killing one police officer and wounding several others. The police then began to fire into the crowd killing an undetermined number of people. This incident is known as the Haymarket Affair.  This event caused a crack down on labor groups.  Due to the violence associated with this day, President Grover Cleveland chose the September date to honor the American worker when declaring the national holiday.

Labor Day does have quite a storied past, therefore it is not just ANY day off from work. It is a day to honor the social and economic achievements of American workers. It is a tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country.  

Why is it important to know the history of Labor Day?  Sometimes, we just need a reminder of the benefits and rights that our fellow Americans fought for in the past for us and for future generations.  As a staffing company in the business of workers for 50 years, we feel this is of great importance!

Happy Labor Day!

Politics in the Workplace – Brace Yourself!

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This year is moving right along as we make our way towards the Fall season!  While kids and teachers prepare to return back to school, others are trying to get in the last days of summer vacations or lining up a job as some make plans to return to the workforce after raising children.

Along with the approach of the Fall months, comes the reality of continued exposure to more politics as the months start to tick by for the November 8th presidential election.

Check out an article in Labor & Industrial Insights Magazine, which examines how to best handle rising political debates, as we grow closer to what promises to be a heated presidential election. In this article, by Dean Lombardo, he discusses the guidance that HR departments can offer their management teams and employees toward keeping the peace during the inevitable political discussions in both a physical and remote workplace setting.

In addition to any policies your organization may have in its employee handbook, it’s important for HR professionals, executives, managers and employees to remember five important guidelines:

  • Know the law
  • Set the tone and be respectful
  • Balance free expression with productivity
  • Use even-handed enforcement
  • Allow the HR department to resolve any issues

What’s the Difference Between a Curriculum Vitae and a Resume?

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Bigstock/BarnieBoogles

Bigstock/BarnieBoogles

You’re in the midst of a job search.   You have a résumé, but you have heard this term Curriculum Vitae (CV) and you wonder if you need a CV instead of or in combination with your résumé.  Information on these two documents, as detailed by the Co-operative Education Program and Career Services Department of the University of Victoria, should help you understand the difference between them  and help you decide what you need for the type of work you are seeking.

A Curriculum Vitae (CV) is a more comprehensive document that details ALL  of your past education, experiences, and expertise, including public presentations, academic writing and professional development.  CVs are focused on academic work with an emphasis on research and teaching.   A curriculum vitae should be used when you want to highlight your background prior to a presentation, when you are applying for work and/or contracts in the academic field,  in advanced research, or in fine arts.

A Résumé summarizes your education, experiences and skills. It’s designed to introduce you to an employer and highlight your qualifications for a specific job or type of work.  A résumé should be used when applying for work, attending job/career fairs, applying for graduate programs, internships, scholarships and networking with potential employers.

Both are used to encourage an employer to consider you as an employee, a candidate for further study or the right fit for a contract, however, the key differences are:

  • CVs are focused on academic work with an emphasis on research and teaching while résumés are focused on non-academic work with an emphasis on related competencies (skills, knowledge and attributes).
  • CVs intend to deliver comprehensive information while résumés aim to summarize key information.
  • CVs are often long – containing anywhere from 5 to 20 pages.  Résumés are generally 1 to 2 pages at the most.

For tips on how to write a Curriculum Vitae (CV) see the following websites:

For tips on how to write a Resume see the following websites: